The New SuperJX‑flash Upgrade Is Available!
This is the pinnacle of Super JX upgrades. This new board is easy as poping in an IC chip and is an unbelievable piece of technology. It allows you to update the firmware on your JX‑10 or MKS‑70 using only MIDI cables!áDaaaauuuumn! Now that's a cool invention!!! It also gives you access to 16 banks of cartridge data which is like having 16 M‑64C cartridges onboard all the time. There's also a version which has 32 banks. Unreal! No more EPROM's are needed for firmware updates. Just send a *.SYX file to the synth. Click here for details and ordering info

SUPERJX-FLASH

SUPER JX ZONE
SUPER JX ZONE

SUPER JX ZONE Join the "JX-10 and MKS-70 Group" on Facebook! SUPER JX ZONE

This page contains JX-10 and MKS-70 information about;

SUPER JX ZONE FAQ - Manuals, Service, ROM IC Updates, SysEx, M-64C Cartridge Copy Functions
SUPER JX ZONE RESTORE FACTORY PATCHES - SysEx Procedure To Reload The Factory Patches And Tones
SUPER JX ZONE SAVE PATCHES - SysEx Procedure To Save All Patches And Tones
SUPER JX ZONE POWER SUPPLY - Tips For Repairing The Power Supply
SUPER JX ZONE SYSTEM SPECS - Dimensions, Power, Audio Output, Accessories
SUPER JX ZONE BATTERY REPLACEMENT - Internal and M-64C Batteries
SUPER JX ZONE EDITING SHORTCUTS - Editing Tones And Patches, Setting Split Points, Global Parameters
SUPER JX ZONE ACCESSORIES - PG-800, M-64C Cartridge, Pedals
SUPER JX ZONE ERROR MESSAGES - Common Error Messages And How To Troubleshoot Them
SUPER JX ZONE MISCELLANEOUS - JX-10 Drain Bamage Porblemz

SUPER JX ZONE Click Here For Info About ROM Updates


SUPER JX ZONE     SUPER JX ZONE SUPER JX ZONE SUPER JX ZONE     SUPER JX ZONE


ANIMATED_STAR I think this topic is important enough to place at the top of all my synth INFO webpages

POWER_TRANSISTORS
Of all the broken gear I've bought on eBay, I'm able to fix about 90% of everything I find. It's usually a simple fix. If you have a synth with no power or intermittent problems after it warms up, it's probably due to the fact that back in the 1980's Roland and other synth makers used sub-par solder and/or not enough solder to hold components in place. After 30+ years, the solder begins to break down and hairline fractures appear. This occurs at a higher rate for components which generate a lot of heat like Bridge Rectifiers, Power Transistors, large Electrolytic Capacitors, power input jacks and audio sockets which get a lot of use. The best approach is to use a magnifying glass and carefully inspect the backside of the circuit board. If you spot any suspect areas, re-flow a hefty amount of NEW solder

Note: Most of the procedures and commands shown on this page are specific to JX‑10 and MKS‑70 synthesizers with Roland factory stock ROM IC's. If you are seeking answers for a JX‑10 or MKS‑70 with ROM IC versions higher than v2.30 (JX‑10) or v1.08 (MKS‑70), please check the Vecoven Project Page for more details. There are some manuals online at that site which contain all the answers you will need


* * * SUPER JX FAQ * * *

QUESTION ANSWER
Where Can I Find Owners Manuals For The JX‑10 And MKS‑70 Synthesizers? FREE Owner's Manuals for almost every synthesizer and effects device can be fount at MidiManuals.com;

         SUPER JX JX-10 Owner's Manual (v.88-7) (This version contains supplementary info about MIDI Control, Patch Change and more)

         SUPER JX MKS-70 Owner's Manual (v.86-10-Version 2) (This version contains additional info re: 'Audition Mode')

         SUPER JX Deutche MKS-70 Bedienungsanleitung (v.ROM-072)

         SUPER JX Franšais MKS-70 Guide de l'utilisateur (v.ROM-071)

FREE Owner's Manuals for almost every synthesizer and effects device can be found at MidiManuals.com;

         SUPER JX midimanuals.com
Where Can I Find Service Manuals And Schematics? JX-10, MKS-70 and PG-800 Service Manuals w/schematics may be downloaded FREE at synfo.nl
These are the highest quality on the Internet. Gigantic collection of many synthesizers here;

         SUPER JX The complete JX-10 Service Manual (Note: Most online versions are missing pages 5, 6, 9 and 10... but not this one)

         SUPER JX synfo.nl
The Fluorescent Indicator Panel (FIP) On My JX‑10 / MKS‑70 Just Bit The Dust. What Now? S-50 / S-550 ZONES-50 / S-550 ZONE

SUPER JX ZONEThe FIP driver coil display is a common point of failure with JX‑10 and MKS‑70 synths. The cause is a manufacturing defect which has been traced to the Sumida Corporation, the only supplier of this coil (JX‑10 P/N: 12449251, MKS‑70 P/N: 12449283). Unfortunately, sources for replacement coils are expensive and sometimes difficult to find. A supplier on eBay has some redesigned replacements which sell for $75 USD. Another hope is to find an old coil from a cannibalized Roland product which uses the same part number. The JX‑10, JX‑8P, GM‑70, GR‑1, DDR‑30, S‑50 and S‑550 synths/samplers use the same part number. However, be aware that these coils may also be defective. There seems to be no rhyme or reason as to when or if a coil will fail. Click on the image for a reference photo showing coil part numbers for different Roland gear

Note: The image on the right shows the coil on a GR‑1 Panel Board Assembly. The coil for a JX‑10 and an MKS‑70 is located on the Display Board but has a different silkscreen designation of T1


Animated NEW Another option is an exciting new development for a modern replacement display created by Guy Wilkinson. A Noritake VFD module can be retrofitted into the existing case of a JX‑10 or MKS‑70. It makes no difference which ROM IC version you have either. It will work with a factory stock system or one with a new Vecoven upgrade. The fonts are super huge, easy to read and it displays a lot more info than the old and boring factory installed display. Another cool feature is that it completely bypasses the old FIP driver coil circuit so there's no need to worry about that timebomb anymore. This new display can be purchased preassembled or as a DIY kit. I have installed this display kit in my JX‑10 and it is an incredible enhancement. Highly recommended!!! Guy has an in‑depth website with all the details at supersynthprojects.com

SUPER JX ZONE
(Noritake VFD)


Here are two videos which describe this new add‑on in more detail

            

How Difficult Is It To Repair Or Replace A Defective Alpha‑Dial Rotary Encoder On The Super JX? Guy Wilkinson to the rescue! Another breaktrough in the Super JX DIY world. A replacement encoder for under $2. Super simple to install and IMO, it works better than the original! Eveything you need to know is at supersynthprojects.com

SUPER JX ZONE
$2 Encoder DIY at supersynthprojects.com
The Cartridge Doesn't Store Data Or Sometimes The Data Appears To Be Corrupt. What's Wrong? One major flaw with the JX‑10 is the flimsy and ill‑positioned ribbon cable connecting the cartridge port to the Assigner Board. After opening and closing the top case on the synth a few times, the ribbon cable can easily catch in between the hinges and get damaged. Also, the bend radius is very narrow. This particular type of ribbon cable is susceptible to trace failures as well. Over time, the bonding comes loose

Guy Wilkinson has created a clever DIY solution consisting of two add‑on circuit boards and some connectors which effectively replace the troublesome ribbon cable assembly. You simply source a couple of inexpensive parts on your own (IDC ribbon cable, two box headers and two ribbon cable sockets) then solder the circuit boards in place. I was able to easily source all the extra components. Guy also sells a complete kit with all the extra cables and parts and he tests it for continuity. This inexpensive DIY Kit is very easy to install. Afterwards, opening and closing the top case on a JX10 is no longer an event where holding your breath is a requirement

SUPER JX ZONE
Cartridge Cable Adaptor Kit available from supersynthprojects.com
What's The Best Wiring Method When Performing The Vecoven v4.x PWM Upgrade?
JX_RIBBONS
Guy Wilkinson is great at designing innovative add-ons for the Super JX and also provides some useful documentation as well for those wishing to perform the new Vecoven PWM upgrade. Be sure to visit his website with tips for a quality and successful upgrade. A recent addition is the PDF document titled, 'PWM Wiring IDC Method' with a visual layout when using IDC ribbon cable connectors. I highly recommend this method because it separates the new PWM circuit boards from the Assigner/Module Boards and helps to reduce any electrical interference

         SUPER JX supersynthprojects.com
How Do I Restore The Factory Preset Patches And Tones Into The Internal Memory Of The Super JX? To restore the factory preset Patches & Tones, you will need an M‑64C Cartridge and a Mac or a PC:
[ WARNING!!! Everything in the internal Super JX memory will be erased! ]

MKS‑70

   1) Connect MIDI Out and MIDI In cables between the Super JX and the computer
   2) Set the Protect Switch on the M‑64C cartridge to the OFF position
   3) Set the Protect Switch on the Super JX to the OFF position
   4) Run one of the generic SysEx loaders for Mac or PC (found on the UTILITIES page at this website)
   5) Load the factory presets file;
          JX10BNK0-A.SYX (this file is available on the PATCHES page - See JX10_MKS70_Collection‑A.zip)
   6) Follow the instructions for the SysEx loader program you are using and send the JX10BNK0‑A.SYX file to the Super JX
   7) Once the load process begins, the screen on the Super JX will read "MIDI BULK LOAD PATCH **"
   8) Factory presets will be be restored after the display cycles through Patches A1‑H8 and Tones 0‑50


JX-10

No matter how hard you try, you will never be able to restore Patches on a factory stock JX‑10 using a generic SysEx utility. The SysEx functions of the JX‑10 are crippled and do not work properly. Believe it or not, that's the way Roland designed it. You will need to use a special utility program such as CPJXWIN (Windows PC) or GenPatch (Atari ST) and have an M‑64C data cartridge plugged into the JX‑10 at the same time. If you decide to use CPJXWIN or GenPatch, you may need to set the transfer speed to a slower rate depending on what year your computer was manufactured. Your other option is to replace the factory ROM IC's with the newer Vecoven ROM IC Upgrade which solves the SysEx problems

Note: An alternative way is to copy all Patches/Tones from an M‑64C cartridge if the factory presets have already been pre‑loaded onto the M‑64C cartridge. There is no other way to load factory preset Patches/Tones on a factory stock Super JX and there is no 'Power On Factory Reset' option

How Do I Save All Of My Patches And Tones Currently Inside The Super JX To A Computer Or Sequencer? To save all the internal Patches & Tones, you will need an M‑64C Cartridge and a Mac or a PC:

MKS‑70

   1) Connect MIDI Out and MIDI In cables between the MKS‑70 and the computer
   2) Set the Protect Switch on the M‑64C cartridge to the ON position
   3) Set the Protect Switch on the front of the MKS‑70 to the ON position
   4) Run one of the utilities for Mac or PC and set it to "Receive SysEx" (found on the UTILITIES page at this website)
   5) On the MKS‑70, push the MIDI button then push the WRITE button. The display responds with 'WRITE MIDI'
   6) Rotate the Alpha-Dial until the display responds with 'MIDI BULK DUMP'
   7) Push the ENTER button
   8) All Patches are sent to the utility program on your computer. Save the file with a *.SYX extension


JX-10

No matter how hard you try, you will never be able to save Patches on a factory stock JX‑10 using a generic SysEx utility. The SysEx functions of the JX‑10 are crippled and do not work properly. Believe it or not, that's the way Roland designed it. You will need to use a special utility program such as CPJXWIN (Windows PC) or GenPatch (Atari ST) and have an M‑64C data cartridge plugged into the JX‑10 at the same time. If you decide to use CPJXWIN or GenPatch, you may need to set the transfer speed to a slower rate depending on what year your computer was manufactured. Your other option is to replace the factory ROM IC's with the newer Vecoven ROM IC Upgrade which solves the SysEx problems

How Do I Copy Patches & Tones From The M‑64C Cartridge Into The Internal Memory Of The Super JX? To load Patches & Tones from the M-64C cartridge into the Super JX internal memory:
[ WARNING!!! Everything in the internal Super JX memory will be erased! ]

   1) Set the Protect Switch on the M-64C cartridge to the ON position
   2) Set the Protect Switch on the Super JX to the OFF position
   3) Push the WRITE button
   4) Rotate the Alpha-Dial until the display responds with:
           'COPY CARTRIDGE TO INTERNAL MEMORY'
   5) Push the ENTER button and the display responds with 'LOAD COMPLETE'
   6) Return the Protect Switch on the Super JX to the ON position

How Do I Copy Patches & Tones From The Internal Memory Of The Super JX Onto The M‑64C Cartridge? To save Patches & Tones from the Super JX internal memory onto the M-64C cartridge:
[ WARNING!!! Everything in the M-64C cartridge memory will be erased! ]

   1) Set the Protect Switch on the Super JX to the ON position
   2) Set the Protect Switch on the M-64C cartridge to the OFF position
   3) Push the WRITE button 
   4) Rotate the Alpha-Dial until the display responds with:
           'COPY INTERNAL MEMORY TO CARTRIDGE'
   5) Push the ENTER button and the display responds with 'SAVE COMPLETE'
   6) Return the Protect Switch on the M-64C cartridge to the ON position

I Can't Get The Super JX To Communicate With My Computer When Using A Librarian Or SysEx Program. What Should I Check? The most common communication errors are with System Exclusive so... let's start with that one;

1) Is System Exclusive turned ON and MIDI Channel set to 1?
Use the front panel buttons on the Super JX and make sure these settings match up;

MKS-70
   [ 1 ] CONTROL CHANNEL
   [ 1 ] CHANNEL A
   [ 1 ] CHANNEL B
   [ ON ] PATCH PROG CHANGE
   [ ON ] SYSTEM EXCLUSIVE
   [ ON ] A PROG CHANGE
   [ ON ] B PROG CHANGE


JX-10 (Requires a special program such as CPJXWIN (Windows), GENPATCH (Atari) or ROM IC equal to or greater than v2.30SE)
   [ 1 ] CONTROL CHANNEL
   [ 1 ] UPPER MIDI CHANNEL
   [ 1 ] LOWER MIDI CHANNEL
   [ ON ] PATCH PROG CHANGE
   [ ON ] SYSTEM EXCLUSIVE
   [ ON ] UPPER PROG CHANGE
   [ ON ] LOWER PROG CHANGE


Note: To save these MIDI settings in memory for future use;
        PRESS THE "MIDI" BUTTON
        PRESS THE "WRITE" BUTTON
        PRESS THE "ENTER" BUTTON


2) Is the computer Sound Card, MIDI Controller, SysEx Librarian, etc... set to MIDI Channel 1?

3) Is the computer Sound Card, MIDI Controller, SysEx Librarian, etc... sending MIDI data to the Super JX?

4) Do you have an M-64C cartridge plugged into the Super JX-10?
        You MUST have an M-64C cartridge plugged into the JX-10 if your ROM IC is v1.72 through v2.30

5) Make sure the patch librarian and SysEx program can send and receive SysEx data to and from the Super JX
        Set the "Protect" switch on the Super JX to the "OFF" position
        Set the "Protect" switch on the M-64C cartridge to the "OFF" position
        Note that there are two switches to check. One switch is on the M-64C cartridge and the other switch is on the Super JX
        The 'Protect' switch for a JX-10 is on the back panel, next to the PG-800 Programmer port
        The 'Protect' switch for an MKS-70 is on the front panel, next to the PG-800 Programmer port


6) Do you have two MIDI cables connected? Two are required because SysEx uses both MIDI IN & MIDI OUT
How Do I Copy Tones From A JX‑8P (M‑16C Cartridge) To An MKS‑70 or JX‑10? 1) Create an internal patch that only uses tones from 1 - 32
2) Press the SHIFT button
3) Press the CARTRIDGE button
4) Select a tone from Cartridge 1 - 32
5) Press ENTER
Mr. Richard Feder of Fort Lee, New Jersey asks;
'How Do I Load Individual JX‑8P Tones From A Computer Into An MKS‑70 or JX‑10? Is it Easy? Is It Difficult? What MIDI Settings Do I Need To Change? Does It Work On A JX‑10?"
"Dear Mr. Feder,
You sure do ask a lot of questions for a guy from New Jersey!
"

First off, it's worth noting that Dave Scoging spent tons of time converting 300+ JX‑8P Tones into JX‑10 and MKS‑70 format and are courtesy of the Fred Vecoven Super JX ROM Project. They are on the PATCHES page for downloading.

Before loading or saving individual Tones to or from the computer, make sure these MIDI settings are correct on your synth;

MKS-70
   [ 1 ] CONTROL CHANNEL
   [ 1 ] CHANNEL A
   [ 1 ] CHANNEL B
   [ ON ] PATCH PROG CHANGE
   [ ON ] SYSTEM EXCLUSIVE
   [ ON ] A PROG CHANGE
   [ ON ] B PROG CHANGE


JX-10 (Requires ROM IC v3.00 or greater)

My rule about SysEx is, 'When dealing with SysEx communication errors... set all parameters to ON'


Using MKS-70 w/ROM IC v1.03 and up:

Load an individual JX-8P .syx Tone file from the computer into a generic SysEx file librarian program like Snoize (Mac) or Bome (Windows).

On the MKS-70, choose a Patch (C-4 for example) then send the SysEx from the generic SysEx file librarian program to the MKS‑70. It will load automatically into the Tone A slot. The flashing period next to the Tone A number indicates a new Tone was loaded into that slot.


Using JX-10 or MKS-70 w/ROM IC v3.00 and greater:
   Same as above


Using JX-10 w/ROM IC v1.72 through v2.30:
   Not Possible. System Exclusive for loading or saving individual Tones is not functional on a factory stock JX‑10


Using JX-10 w/ROM IC v2.30SE:
   Not Possible (unless the JX-8P Tones are first converted into a special format by a software genius)
How Do I Change The Internal Back‑Up Battery? I recommend that you take your synthesizer to a Roland Authorized Service Center because installing a new battery is a tedious task. The battery is soldered onto the Assigner Board. But...... if you're a real sicko like me and insist on saving pennies because you have that foolish "I can do that myself" attitude...... then...... detailed instructions are available. A big advantage of taking it to a Roland Authorized Service Center is that if they accidentally "pop" an IC because of static discharge, the cost is on them;CR2450 Battery

         SUPER JX JX-10 And MKS-70 Internal Battery Replacement Guide
My Super JX Seems To Be Experiencing Some Noise, Buzzing And 60 Cycle Hum? Is There A Way To Eliminate This Noise? One of the contributors (scottrod) on an online forum at gearsz.com offers this fix;

'Got an MKS-70 with the same problem, serious 60‑cycle hum artifacts on all outputs. Raising or lowering volume pot doesn't change hum level. Recapped power supply, no change. Turned out to be the wire routing inside the unit. This one was untouched inside, purchased from original owner. All the low power DC lines (▒15, +5, grounds) coming from the power supply unit going to the assigner and module boards were routed right next to the main power transformer. Rerouted the lines to keep everything as far away from the transformer as possible; all hum gone, super clean outputs now.'

MKS-70 Hum Mod Icon Many Thanks to scottrod who has put together this intricate and amazing photo DIY guide for eliminating the 60‑cycle hum problem. The amazing part is that you don't need to cut any wires. My favorite kind of mod! This DIY guide could also be very useful for JX‑10 owners.

         SUPER JX MKS-70 Hum Modification DIY Guide

         SUPER JX MKS-70 Hum Modification DIY Guide + High Rez Photos
            (Warning: Very Large *.ZIP File ~ 255MB)
Having trouble with Split Keyboards on the MKS‑70?
The MKS-70 has three MIDI channels, one each for Tone A and Tone B blocks, and one for the control channel. If the control channel is the same as one of the Tone A or Tone B blocks, some single channel controllers will only play one of the blocks. Try changing Tone A and Tone B blocks to a different channel.

Note: The control channel setting for the MKS-70 is MIDI parameter [ 12 - CONTROL CHANNEL ]. This is also the MIDI channel which is normally set to MIDI channel #1. It is recommended that the Tone A and Tone B MIDI channels be changed instead. These are MIDI parameters [ 21 - CHANNEL A ] and [ 31 - CHANNEL B ] respectively.
Why Does My MKS‑70 Only Play One Tone Across Half The Keyboard And Then Nothing Or Just Play One Tone Or Both Tones All The Way Across The Keyboard? Sometimes Patches that were created on the JX‑10 do not set the split points properly when loaded into an MKS‑70. Going into the Patch menu and re‑setting the split points and then saving the Patch should fix this problem.
The Aftertouch On My JX‑10 Keyboard Doesn't Seem To Be Very Responsive. Is there A Way To Fix It? Over time, oxidation builds up on conductive plates which control the aftertouch signals. A compiled list of articles, videos and user comments is available here;

         SUPER JX JX-10 Aftertouch Page

One Or More Of The Keys On My JX-10 Won't Play Sound Or Will Only Play Sound Some Of The Time. What Should I Check? SUPER JXAs usual, Guy Wilkinson has some of the best advice around. This very detailed guide for repairing keyboard contacts will get your JX‑10 back to normal. The repair info here can also be applied to other Roland keyboards such as the W‑30, S‑50, D‑50, Alpha Juno‑2, etc... since they use the same style membrane

         SUPER JX JX-10 Keyboard Contact Repair

The Buttons On My Super JX Are Working Intermittently. Is There A Way To Fix It? SUPER JX30 Years later, the buttons (tact switches) are starting to fail. The best solution is to replace all of them at the same time because if you only replace a few, others are bound to fail soon after. eBay and other vendors sell complete sets of tact switches and these range anywhere from $30 USD to $92 USD. Ouch! You can save a lot of money buying them instead from an electronics supplier such as mouser.com


JX‑10
There are two types of tact switches to choose from. I prefer a harder press Operating Force of 2.6 Newton. A total of 53 switches are needed (Do yourself a favor and buy a couple of spares because... shit happens)

1)     Brand Name: ALPS
        Manufacturer P/N: SKHCBFA010
        Mouser P/N: 688-SKHCBFA010 (about $14 USD for a set of 53) 
        Operating Force: 1.3 Newton*
        Operating Life: 1,000,000 cycles
        Size: 4.3mm (H) x 12mm (W) x 12mm (D)

2)     Brand Name: ALPS
        Manufacturer P/N: SKHCBHA010
        Mouser P/N: 688-SKHCBHA010 (about $17 USD for a set of 53)
        Operating Force: 2.6 Newton
        Operating Life: 500,000 cycles
        Size: 4.3mm (H) x 12mm (W) x 12mm (D)

* Original JX-10 factory tact switches had a 1.3 Newton Operating Force
   Roland P/N: 13129704 - ALPS P/N: SKHCAB131A
   This same switch is also used on the Alpha Juno‑1, Alpha Juno‑2, HS‑1 and HS‑80 synths
   OMRON brand tact switches P/N: B3F‑4000 and P/N: B3F‑4005 also work but they are twice the price


SUPER JX
MKS‑70
There are two types of tact switches to choose from. I prefer a harder press Operating Force of 2.6 Newton. A total of 30 switches are needed (Do yourself a favor and buy a couple of spares because... shit happens)

1)     Brand Name: ALPS
        Manufacturer P/N: SKHHAPA010
        Mouser P/N: 688-SKHHAP (about $7 USD for a set of 30)
        Operating Force: 1.6 Newton
        Operating Life: 500,000 cycles
        Size: 9.5mm (H) x 6mm (W) x 6mm (D)

2)     Brand Name: ALPS
        Manufacturer P/N: SKHHBSA010
        Mouser P/N: 688-SKHHBS (about $7 USD for a set of 30)
        Operating Force: 2.6 Newton**
        Operating Life: 200,000 cycles
        Size: 9.5mm (H) x 6mm (W) x 6mm (D)

** Original MKS-70 factory tact switches had a 2.6 Newton Operating Force
    (Roland P/N: 13159154 - ALPS P/N: SKHHBS)
    This same switch is also used on the MKS-50 synth




The Operating Life for all of these switches is realistically, probably 10 years until stress and/or oxidation starts to set in and they become intermittentSUPER JX. Removing old tact switches from the PCB is a matter of personal preference. The method I prefer is;

Use a small sharp pair of diagonal flush wire cutters and cut all four leads off from the top side of the PCB. Take extra care not to wedge the wire cutters in‑between the base of the tact switch and the PCB when cutting the leads. This places excess force on the eyelet trace on the underside of the PCB causing possible damage. Use a solder sucker, a fine tipped soldering iron or a stainless steel hollow desoldering needle and remove the leftover pins from the PCB holes. Remove any excess solder remaining in the holes. The eyelet traces on the brittle 30‑year old PCB are very fragile. Take extra care not to lift them off the surface of the PCB while desoldering. Using too much heat or keeping the soldering iron too long in one spot usually leads to this type of problem

BUTTON CUSHION
Since we're on the subject of buttons, while you're at it... you might want to consider replacing those crumbling foam inserts which separate the buttons from the tact switches. These cushions start to break apart after years of use. A visitor to this website and Super JX owner suggested using a sheet of Neoprene. I bought a sheet and it works incredibly well. In fact, I think it works better than the original cushions. The buttons stand up straight, they are in perfect alignment with the sides and they're uniformly flat along the tops. It makes the button presses a little more rigid which is my preference

I recommend using Neoprene sheets which are 1/16' thick, the same thickness as the original cushions. I've found the easiest way to cut out the round holes is by using miniature sissors found on most Swiss Army knives. As of August 2016, you can find a roll of 1/16' x 3' x 36' Neoprene from USA eBay vendor rubbersheetwarehouse for only $5 and free shipping. Heck of a bargain!

Over the years, the button cushions on my JX‑10 crumbled into dust and I was unable to replace them easily. I purchased a 2nd JX‑10 later on and made exact measurements of the cushions. If you are in a similar situation, here are some templates and instructions for making your own
BUTTON CUSHION


         SUPER JX JX-10 Button Cushion Templates

Note: The button cusion shown above sits underneath the numeric keypad. This one is in a deteriorated state and the '+' patterns have been worn away after years of use. The only holes you need to cut out are the round ones. There are a total of three button cushions to replace (65mm x 80mm, 250mm x 55mm and 255mm x 55mm)
What Are My Options For Replacing The Sliders On A JX‑10?
SLIDERPOT
Most scans of the JX‑10 Service Manual found online have omitted the schematics and board layouts for the Volume Board. This PCB contains the six sliders in question. I recently found a complete version of the JX‑10 Service Manual and the download link is near the top of this page

After a visual inspection and removing the sliders from the Volume board, here's some info I was able to find:

There are six slider pots labeled VR1, VR2, VR3, VR4, S1 and S2. Four are potentiometers and two act as switches. Compared to normal slider pots I've seen available for purchase, the JX‑10's are unusual because they have a quad set of pins on each side which makes them impossible to source. The only source I know of is buying a used Volume Board on eBay. Even then, the sliders on it would probably be just as crappy as the ones you are trying to replace. Because these are so difficult to find and replace, most JX‑10 owners carefully disassemble the original slider pots, clean them with DeoxIT Fader Lube and reassemble. Special care needs to be taken when cleaning since these are vintage sliders. It's very easy to accidentally remove the carbon layers inside which will render them useless

Each slider shares these identical characteristics:

     Dimensions = 45mm (L) x 8mm (W) x 6mm (H)
     Pins = 8 (Actually, 10 but two are used for stabilizing the outer case and shielding)
     Lever Travel = 30mm
     Insulated Lever = 15mm from the top of the outer case to the tip of the lever
     Pin Spacing Template = See the 7‑page JX‑10 Slider FAQ

And, here are the individual specs:
Function       Board Component  Case Markings  Notes
-------------  ---------------  -------------  --------------------------------------------
MASTER VOLUME      VR1          M 50KΩD 62 D   50K Ω Slide Potentiometer: Logarithmic Taper
C1                 VR2            10KΩB 62 1E  10K Ω Slide Potentiometer: Linear Taper
C2                 VR3            10KΩB 62 1E  10K Ω Slide Potentiometer: Linear Taper
AFTERTOUCH         VR4            10KΩB 62 1E  10K Ω Slide Potentiometer: Linear Taper
BEND RANGE         S1             M 63M Ω      Slide Switch: Has 2 detents + 4 settings 
VOICE MEMORY       S2             M 63M Ω      Slide Switch: Has 2 detents + 4 settings
if you are serious about replacing any of these sliders, I've put together a very detailed FAQ. This lengthy document contains pin resistance measurements while removed from the Volume Board, dimensions, rebuild info... everything except where to buy replacements

         SUPER JX JX‑10 Slider FAQ (7‑page PDF Document)

VOLUME BOARD - SMALL
JX‑10 Volume Board Front And Back w/Notations - Click For Larger Image
What Are The Main Differences Between The JX‑10 And The MKS‑70? Other than the keyboard, the architecture of these two synths is virtually identical. They both use similar Module and Assigner boards. The JX‑10 has inputs on the back for external devices like an EV‑5 expression pedal and a DP‑2 pedal which can double as a switch pedal (to step through Patches) or as a hold pedal to sustain notes. The JX‑10 also has a built‑in sequencer. A single sequence can be saved onto an M‑16C or M‑64C cartridge. The MKS‑70 has a full octave bend range while the JX‑10 can only bend notes up to a perfect fifth. The biggest difference is the lack of SysEx commands available for the JX‑10. A factory stock JX‑10 is a real outcast when trying to communicate with computers or other hardware. Thankfully, the Vecoven ROM IC upgrade has corrected this oversight and provides full SysEx communication for the JX‑10 plus a lot of other great enhancements

Factory Synth     Keyboard       SysEx      Sequencer    Bender Range   Pedal Control   C1/C2 Control
-------------     --------     ----------   ---------    ------------   -------------   -------------
    JX-10            YES         LIMITED       YES         2-3-4-7           YES             YES
    
    MKS-70           NO            YES         NO         2-3-4-7-12      MIDI ONLY          NO    
AUDIO OUTS
(The 'H-M-L" level switch only affects the output from the TOTAL MIX audio jack)
What Are The Pin‑outs For A PG‑800 Cable And How Do I Build One? The PG-800 cable is a 6-Pin straight through cable. Click here for a DIY on how to build one yourself SUPER JX ZONE
Where Can I Get MKS‑70 And JX‑10 Questions Answered? On January 1, 2015 a new Facebook page for JX‑10 and MKS‑70 owners and developers was created;

Login to Facebook and then click this link    SUPER JX ZONE   https://www.facebook.com/groups/SuperJX/    then click  SUPER JX ZONE




A popular online forum for getting a lot of synthesizer related questions answered is at gearsz.com;

         SUPER JX http://gearsz.com



Also, there is a discussion group specifically for JX and MKS Series synthesizers at YAHOO. Joining is FREE and easy;

"Description: A discussion group for owners of Roland's JX series of analog synths (JX‑3P, JX‑8P, JX‑10, MKS‑30, MKS‑70). The JX‑series is often overlooked in favor of both the Jupiter and Juno‑series and deserves it's own place where users can share tips, patches, stories, or ask questions for these underrated synths."

 To Subscribe, visit;

         SUPER JX http://groups.yahoo.com/group/rolandjxanalogs/

My Super JX Won't Power On Or It Acts Strange After Warming Up. What Should I Check?
POWER_TRANSISTORS
Left: Q1 & Q4 - Right: Q5
One of the most common failure points for the Super JX and other Roland synths is the Power Supply Unit (PSU). After 30+ years, the sub-par solder used by Roland has a tendency to break down and cause hairline fractures. This occurs at a higher rate for components which generate a lot of heat like the Bridge Rectifiers (D4 & D5), Power Transistors (Q1, Q4 & Q5), and the three large Electrolytic Capacitors (C11, C12 & C13). If you have problems with no power, intermittent power or the synth acts weird after warming up, chances are good that a hairline crack is the cause. These cracks in the solder are nearly impossible to see. Use a magnifying glass to inspect the bottom of the Power Supply Unit and reflow NEW solder on any suspect areas

One problem area on the PSU are the three Power Transistors (Q1, Q4 & Q5). These components generate a lot of heat which is why they are attached to a giant aluminum heat sink. After hundreds of heat cycles being powered on and off and also from case movement, these components will sometimes fail or cause hairline solder fractures. Toshiba P/N: 2SB1015 (PNP) and 2SD1406 (NPN) can sill be purchased from eBay vendor UTSource and are inexpensive @ only $1 each

Guy Wilkinson shared an excellent tip for preventing future problems with these Power Transistors. Don't cut the pins flush and bend the end of each lead at a right angle to strengthen the joint. "I found the solder pads for the transistors way too weak for the PSU in the MKS70 - because the casing/bottom lid flexes slightly when you move it thus putting strain on the joints. So I boosted the pads before fitting new transistors. This way is very secure."

POWER_TRANSISTORS

Another issue with strange behavior can be traced to a defective electrolytic capacitor. After 30+ years and a lot of power surges, some electrolytic capacitors have a tendency to bulge and leak. For the Super JX, it's a good practice to recap the PSU. It's a fairly straight forward job to replace all ten electrolytic capacitors and the cost is under $10 (USD). Service Manuals for the JX‑10 and MKS‑70 show identical PSU part numbers. In fact, you will notice on the MKS‑70 PSU that "JX‑10 / MKS‑70" is silkscreened in the lower left corner. However, there are some slight differences. For example, when compared to the JX‑10, the MKS‑70 PSU is missing the large black Line Filter (L1) and has two additional daughter‑boards for those components. One is the EMI Board and is soldered onto the lower left corner of the PSU. The other is the Filter Board which is mounted towards the back of the case. This board contains the missing Line Filter (L1). The important thing to note is that all of the Electrolytic Capacitors and Power Transistors are identical on the PSU for both Super JX models
SUPER_JX_PSB
(Recapping The PSU - Ten Electrolyic Capacitors)

Three of the caps are gigantic and the other seven are normal sized. The LEAD SPACING and the DIAMETER sizes are not critical for the smaller caps but these need to be exact for the three large caps. Otherwise, C11, C12 and C13 won't fit onto the PSU. The three large caps are somewhat difficult to remove because they are glued to the PCB so use an X-Acto knife or a razor blade to carefully cut the glue away from the base of the PSU. The PSU is 30+ years old and the solder traces have a tendency to separate from the surface. Use caution by choosing a lower heat setting than normal for the soldering iron and don't keep it on the PSU for too long. Feel free to use different manufacturers part numbers*, but make sure the VOLTAGE is equal to or greater than the original specs. Keep in mind that increasing the voltage rating on any of the three large caps might increase the diameter size. (Note: Some of the caps shown below have a slightly higher VOLTAGE rating than the original specs. The original VOLTAGE specs are shown in red)
PART NUMBERS AND SPECS FOR RECAPPING (mouser.com)

QUAN  VALUE  VOLTAGE DIAM  SPACING  TYPE/TERMINATION     PCB LOCATION  PART NUMBER     PRICE  TOTAL
----  ------ ------- ----- -------  -------------------  ------------  --------------  -----  -----
  1     1uF  50V/50V  5mm    2mm    Electrolytic/Radial            C4  ULD1H010MDD1TD  $0.16  $0.16
  2   4.7uF  50V/35V  5mm    2mm    Electrolytic/Radial       C3 - C8      ECA-1HM4R7  $0.20  $0.40
  1    10uF  50V/16V  5mm    2mm    Electrolytic/Radial            C1      ECA-1HM100  $0.20  $0.20  
  3   100uF  50V/16V  8mm  3.5mm    Electrolytic/Radial  C2 - C6 - C9      ECA-1HM101  $0.33  $0.99
  2  4700uF  35V/35V 22mm   10mm    Electrolytic/Snap In    C12 - C13    LLS1V472MELZ  $2.65  $5.30   
  1  6800uF  25V/25V 25mm   10mm    Electrolytic/Snap In          C11    LLS1E682MELA  $2.79  $2.79
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                              $9.84
* When choosing new caps, do yourself a favor and use a high quality brand name manufacturer like Nichicon or Panasonic. The cheapo brands will probably give you more problems down the road in less than 10 years time




Information about Super JX ROM's previously located at this spot has been moved to a new webpage

EPROM

         MKS-70 Link Arrow Click Here For Info About Super JX ROM Updates



* * * SPECIFICATIONS * * *

DIMENSIONS WIDTH DEPTH HEIGHT
WEIGHT
JX-10
46 11/16"

1,186 mm
14 3/4"

375 mm
4"

101 mm
30 lb.  14 oz. 

14.0 kg
MKS-70
18 7/8"

480 mm
15 3/4"

400 mm
3 7/17"

88 mm
16 lb.  20 oz.

7.6 kg
AUDIO OUTPUT                 H                                 M                                 L                 PARALLEL-A / PARALLEL-B
JX-10 +20dBm max
8.0K Ω
+5dBm max
41.0K Ω
-10dBm max
47.8K Ω
3.3K Ω / 3.3K Ω
MKS-70+20dBm max
5.1K Ω
+5dBm max
8.8K Ω
-10dBm max
4.5K Ω 
3.3K Ω / 3.3K Ω
* The "H - M - L" LEVEL switch only controls the audio level sent to the TOTAL MIX output jack. This switch has no effect on the PARALLEL OUTPUT jacks
PRODUCTION YEAR RETAIL PRICE (USD) POWER KEYBOARD MEMORY
JX-10 1986 $2,995 28W 76 Keys - 6 Octaves 128 Patches (64 RAM / 64 RAM Cartridge)
150 Tones (50 ROM / 50 RAM / 50 RAM Cartridge)
MKS-70 1987 $2,295 32W None 128 Patches (64 RAM / 64 RAM Cartridge)
150 Tones (50 ROM / 50 RAM / 50 RAM Cartridge)
INTERNAL BATTERY** POWER CABLE (US)
P/N: CR2450 CR2450 Battery


** SUPER JX Battery Replacement DIY
ROLAND P/N: 2P-AC1

HOSA P/N: PWC-178
AC Power Cable
2-Prong Square Connector 110V / 117V

8ft Cables Only $11.49 @ sweetwater.com + FREE Ship!
MKS-70 Power Mod IconTired of always looking for that oddball 2-Prong AC power cable? I was... and I did something about it.

Here's a super simple mod that will let you use the more common 3‑Prong AC cable. The mod is so simple that all it needs is a picture to explain. It's easy as 'connect the dots'. If you buy the correct sized AC power adapter, it's a 1 for 1 swap, no case modification and no sheet metal to cut. There's even a pre‑drilled hole in the case for the ground wire. Just piggy‑back onto one of the screw holes used for the serial number plate. Easy!

The image shows the DIY mod for an MKS‑70 but this should also work with a JX‑10, Alpha Juno‑1, Alpha Juno‑2, HS‑10 and HS‑80 and many Roland synths. If you are using a synth with something running on power other than 110/117V AC, please note... this mod has NOT been verified to work on a synth running 220V/240V. This DIY mod is only for those with electronics experience. The original poster accepts no liability if you damage your synth or kill yourself. Unplug the synth from the power outlet and when working with electricity, always keep one hand behind your back. It's the best way to stay alive

MKS-70 Link Arrow AC Power Receptacle Replacement DIY
High Quality Replacement Power Switch [ JX-10 ]
Power Rating: 6A @ 250V AC

Type: SPST w/Solder Lugs

Panel Cut-Out: 13mm x 19mm
JX-10 ROCKER SWITCH JX-10 ROCKER SWITCH JX-10 ROCKER SWITCH JX-10 ROCKER SWITCH
P/N @ mouser.com 633-CWSA11AANS* 633-CWSA11AAN1S 633-CWSA11AAN2S 633-CWSA11AAN3S
* The original rocker switch has no actuator markings on the face like some of these replacements. The original switch has a red bar which appears on the lower side when the switch is turned on. It's a totally useless design because you can't even see the red bar unless your eyelevel is underneath the synth! Weird!! I've concluded that the power switch was installed upside‑down at the factory because when you view the label on the switch from inside the JX‑10 case, the lettering is upside‑down. Every JX‑10, U‑20 and Alpha Juno‑2 I've ever seen is the same way as shown here. Most likely, installing it upside‑down was a suggestion made by the same engineer who designed the original SysEx code ☺

The replacement switch most similar to the original is Mouser P/N: 633‑CWSA11AANS but it does not have the red bar so... it's even worse than the original!! I've always hated the original switch because it was so difficult to see against the dark backplate. I opted to replace mine with P/N: 633‑CWSA11AAN1S because it has more visibility. The price for P/N: 633‑CWSA11AAN1S as of March 2016 was $1.80 USD. The original rocker switch (Roland P/N: 13149108) was also used on a zillion other Roland synths and devices some of which include the JX‑8P, Juno 60/106, Alpha Juno‑1/2, U‑20, JV‑80, JD‑800, D‑10/20/50/70, MK‑80, and MPU‑101
Average Quality Replacement Power Switch [ JX-10 ]
Power Rating: 6A @ 250V AC

Type: DPST w/Solder Lugs

Panel Cut-Out: 13mm x 19mm
JX-10 ROCKER SWITCH JX-10 ROCKER SWITCH
SKU# @ taydaelectronics.com A-5091 A-5092
I'm posting these two alternative switches from Tayda because of the low cost and high visibility of the red switch A‑5092. These are DPST switches, have the same power rating and will work equally well as the switches from Mouser. The price for these as of March 2016 was only 25¢. After evaluating all types, I prefer the higher quality switches from Mouser
Replacement Power Switch [ MKS-70 ]
Power Rating: 5A @ 250V AC

Type: ON/OFF w/Four Solder Lugs
MKS-70 POWER SWITCH
P/N: ALPS: SDGA3P           Sony/JVC/Panasonic: 554-880-12           Roland: 13129124
If your old switch is experiencing problems, don't bother trying to repair it. Some of the parts inside are sealed in plastic and other parts are wired in place. Repairing it is a lost cause. This power switch works with the MKS‑70 and a wide selection of other Roland synths and samplers including the D‑110, D‑550, GM‑70, JV‑880, MKS‑20, MKS‑50, MKS‑80, MKS‑100, S‑220, S‑550 and U‑220. In the 1980's and 1990's, this power switch was also used with a variety of Sony/JVC/Panasonic TV's and component stereo devices. This power switch is quite robust and more expensive than most. Replacements can be found on eBay for less than $11 (USD). Do a keyword search for "ALPS  SDGA3P"


* * * OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES * * *

PG‑800 PROGRAMMER

The PG‑800 programmer gives easy access to all of the editing features on the Super JX‑10 and MKS‑70. Most Super JX‑10 and MKS‑70 owners prefer this editing device compared to software editors or the Alpha‑Dial because of ease of use and functionality. The PG‑800 allows real‑time editing which enables the user to change sounds while playing live. It is also possible to use the PG‑800 to send editing parameters via MIDI for live MIDI sequencing. This external plug‑in device is extremely hard to find on the used market at a reasonable price. The original retail price in 1985 was $349. The used price today........Fuhgettaboutit!



SUPER JX ZONE

Build Your Own PG-800 Cable
SUPER JX ZONE

BEHRINGER BCR2000

W. James Meagher worked overtime to craft some amazing BCR2000 control files for use with a Vecoven 4.x PWM upgraded Super JX. Compared to a PG‑800 or KIWI PE, the BCR2000 is a low cost alternative Patch editor and MIDI controller. Plus, the BCR2000 works with several other synths

Custom template overlays and *.BCR, *.SYX control files are available for downloading in the FILES section at the "Roland JX‑10 and MKS‑70 Synthesizers" Facebook page

Tip: One of the best prices I've seen anywhere for the BCR2000 in the USA is at sweetwater.com. The price as of September 2016 was $149 (USD) which includes FREE shipping + FREE 2‑Year Extended Warranty
BCR2000
KIWITECHNICS PATCH EDITOR

There's a new kid on the block. The Kiwitechnics Patch Editor is an external hardware device similar to the PG‑800. It offers patch editing functionality on a whole new level. This device works with the MKS‑70 and several other synths including the MKS‑50, Alpha Juno 1 + 2, Oberheim Matrix 6 + 1000, Korg DW‑8000 + M1, Waldorf Pulse and many more. There's a great video at the Kiwitechnics web‑page demonstrating what it can do with an MKS‑70

More info at;

         SUPER JX kiwitechnics.com
Kiwi

MEMORY CARTRIDGE M-64C / M-16C / Symphony 128 S64

NOTE: ALWAYS SET THE PROTECT SWITCH TO THE "ON" POSITION BEFORE INSERTING OR REMOVING THE M‑64C / M‑16C

The M‑64C cartridge is compatible with several Roland synthesizers and drum machines including the Super JX‑10, MKS‑70, MKS‑80, Alpha Juno‑2, JX‑8P, MKS‑20, MKS‑30, TR‑707, TR‑727, TR‑909, DDR‑30, GR‑700, and GR‑77B

The M‑64C has the same design as the M‑16C except that the M‑64C has four times the memory capacity of the M‑16C. The JX‑10 and MKS‑70 can read/import JX‑8P patches that have been stored from a JX‑8P onto an M‑16C [See FAQ Section Above For The Copy Procedure]

The Super JX‑10 can use an M‑16C and M‑64C cartridge with the on‑board sequencer. The M‑16C capacity is 400 notes and the M‑64C capacity is 1600 notes. An M‑64C cartridge holds Patches [A1 through H8], Tones [1 through 50], and 12 MIDI Parameters.

If you have an M‑64C which was used on a different piece of Roland gear (TR‑707, GR‑700, etc...) and you want to use it with your JX‑10 or MKS‑70, set the PROTECT switch to the 'OFF' position. Use the WRITE procedure twice. This same procedure is needed when initializing a blank M‑64C cartridge for the first time



SUPER JX ZONEOne of the coolest things I've seen in decades is the Vecoven M‑1024C High Capacity Cartridge. This custom built cartridge enables you to store the equivalent of sixteen M‑64C cartridges and also enables you to copy those cartridges between banks. New high capacity RAM IC's have been fused onto an older style Roland cartridge connector to make this one of the most desirable upgrades for your Super JX synth. Finding sixteen used M‑64C cartridges on eBay or elsewhere would easily cost more than $1,000, not to mention the time involved to find them. To use this new invention, you will need the latest Vecoven firmware IC on your Super JX (3.05 and higher or 4.x). EXTREMELY cool! A high resolution label suitable for printing is here, courtesy of W. James Meagher




Roland released three sets of JX‑10 and MKS‑70 Patch and Tone banks on cartridges. These were slightly different than the M‑64C. They are ROM cartridges and have no ON/OFF PROTECT switch. You can't write Patch or Tone data onto these cartridges. These cartridges are bad candidates to use for a Vecoven M‑1024C cartridge upgrade since they lack the write protect switch


SUPER JX ZONE
VR Series ROM cartridges

         SUPER JX Download a text file list of all VR Series Patches here

  SET #       NAME              ROLAND PART #
  ------     --------------     -------------
  VR-101     Acoustic 1         PM-JX10-01
  VR-102     Synth 1            PM-JX10-02
  VR-103     Sound Effect 1     PM-JX10-03


BATTERY REPLACEMENT
SUPER JX ZONE
M‑64C and M‑16C cartridges use an internal lithium battery to hold the patches and tones in memory. One day that battery will die and the patches will be lost. The life span of the battery is projected anywhere from five to ten years. Mine is still working fine after 29+ years. The internal battery is factory soldered in place onto the cartridge circuit board.

M‑64C / M‑16C Lithium Battery Replacement Part Number: CR‑1/3N
SUPER JX ZONE NOTE: DO NOT UNSOLDER THE BATTERY. THERE IS ALWAYS AN EXPLOSION RISK!
To remove the old battery, use a small pair of wire cutters to carefully cut both battery leads from the circuit board then discard the battery. Unsolder the leads left behind and remove all solder from the holes. Ensure the holes are large enough for the leads on the new battery. When soldering the new battery in place, use eye protection, a heat‑sink and make very quick solder joints.

Replacement CR‑1/3N lithium batteries should be ordered with the 'PCB Pins' option. One company selling this specialty battery is;

         SUPER JX batteriesamerica.com
SUPER JX ZONE
An instruction sheet and a high‑res schematic
for the M‑64C RAM cartridge is here




SUPER JX ZONE

High Res Label for Vecoven M‑1024C here
Courtesy of W. James Meagher




Back in the 1980's, a company called Symphony Series, Inc. made a fantastic product called the Symphony 128/S64. The cool thing about this item was that it had two external DIP switches to choose between four banks of Roland cartridge data. It was the equivalent of having four M‑64C cartridges available at the same time for a Super JX, MKS‑80, Alpha Juno‑2 or four M‑16C cartridges available at the same time for a JX‑8P, MKS‑20, MKS‑30, TR‑707, TR‑727, TR‑909, DDR‑30, GR‑700, and GR‑77B. VERY Nice!

SUPER JX ZONE
Symphony 128/S64 4‑Bank RAM cartridge



Unlike a Roland M‑64C or M‑16C cartridge, the backup battery is easily replaceable and uses a standard CR2032 Lithium 3V Button Cell. It's a simplistic, goofy looking battery holder but... it's easy to use and it gets the job done

SUPER JX ZONE



SUPER JX ZONE

EV-5 EXPRESSION PEDAL
[ JX-10 ONLY ]


This pedal is a variable resistor for controlling different functions. Depending on how the Control Assign Jacks are setup on the JX‑10, this pedal can function as a real‑time parameter control pedal [UPPER & LOWER BALANCE, PORTAMENTO TIME, TOTAL VOLUME, UPPER & LOWER MIDI MESSAGES]

[NOTE: When the EV‑5 pedal is connected to the Control Assign Jack, the assigned Control Assign function cannot be controlled with the Control Assign Knob but only with the EV‑5 pedal]




The EV‑5 retails for the outrageous price of $119 USD and the EV‑7 retails for even more at $279 USD. It is a very simple circuit and it is quite easy to make an equivalent tabletop hand controlled input device using a couple of inexpensive potentiometers, a 1/4" stereo plug, an enclosure and 2‑conductor shielded cable

Instead of buying the 1/4" stereo plug and 2‑conductor shielded cable separately, I suggest that you buy an inexpensive, ready‑made cable on eBay and snip off one end. That way, you'll have a 1/4" plug already soldered onto a cable which will eliminate extra work on your part. I have found this to be the least expensive route. I was able to build one for under $11 - and that includes the shipping charges!

Q: Why would I want to use this instead of a foot controller?
A: I find using a hand‑held expression controller is useful for controlling the synth during mixing sessions plus, I have more accurate control using my fingers intead of my foot. Granted, it's not a true foot controller but, it's still a useful real‑time input device
. Of course, the main reason is the cost. It's a savings of $108 which is substantial

U-20 ZONE

U-20 Homepage EV-5 Owner's Manual
   (Japanese and English)

U-20 ZONE

U-20 Homepage EV-7 Owner's Manual
EV-5 DIY SCHEMATIC

Notes:
  • The image shown on the right is a dual EV‑5 hand controller. This variation on the original design uses one 1/4" stereo output jack and one 3.5mm stereo output jack (hidden from view). Using output jacks instead of hard‑wiring the output cables was preferred since I already had several existing ready‑made cables. The knobs on top are the Main Controllers (VR1). The knobs on the side are the 'Set‑and‑Forget' Min/Max volume (VR2)
  • There is an optional add-on polarity switch mod which enables EV‑5 compatibility with non‑Roland gear. Details for adding this optional switch into the circuit are here
  • Also works great with the Synthrotek MST Expressor Eurorack module
  EV-5 DIY Parts List (Hand Controller Version)
   Tayda P/N: A-1982 - 10K Ohm Linear Pot
   Tayda P/N: A-1983 - 50K Ohm Linear Pot
   Tayda P/N: A-5081 - 1/4' Stereo Plug
   Tayda P/N: A-5166 - 1590A Enclosure
   2-Conductor Shielded Cable (Shield = Ground)

   taydaelectronics.com




SUPER JX ZONE
Variation: DIY Dual hand controller with optional ouput jacks

Adjusting the EV-5 Min/Max Volume Knob

DP-6 PEDAL [ Momentary Switch ]
DP-8 / DP-10 PEDAL [ Momentary Switch + On/Off Switch ]
[ JX-10 ONLY ]

Momentary foot‑switch for controlling different functions. Depending on how the Control Assign Jacks are setup on the JX‑10, the foot pedal can control PATCH SHIFT, PORTAMENTO, CHASE PLAY or UPPER & LOWER HOLD parameters. The DP‑6 Has been discontinued but the DP‑8 and DP‑10 will function in the same manner as the DP‑6. Just set the Function Select switch (located on the side of the DP‑8 / DP‑10) to the "Switch" position

SUPER JX ZONE

U-20 Homepage DP-8 Owner's Manual
DP-2 PEDAL SWITCH [ Momentary Switch ]
[ JX-10 ONLY ]


Same function as the DP‑6 pedal but the DP‑2 model costs less and is made mostly of plastic parts
SUPER JX ZONE
FS-1 FOOT SWITCH [ On/Off Switch ]
[ JX-10 ONLY ]

This is an ON/OFF switch and is made mostly of metal parts

MKS-50 ZONE
Pedal Model     Description            Product Status
-----------     ------------------     --------------
   FS-1         On/Off                 Discontinued
   DP-2         Momentary              Current
   DP-6         Momentary              Discontinued
   DP-8         Momentary + On/Off     Discontinued
   DP-10        Momentary + On/Off     Current
   EV-5         Variable Resistor      Current
   EV-7         Variable Resistor      Current
   EV-10        Variable Resistor      Discontinued


* * * SUPER JX EDITING SHORTCUTS * * *

Note: These shortcuts and more can be found on the UTILITIES page in the seven‑page PDF guide titled;

         SUPER JX 'MKS-70 Reference Cards. Illustrated Guide With Useful Editing Tips And Tricks'

Quickly step through Patch Parameters using the Alpha-Dial instead of the Number buttons
        1) Press the PATCH button
        2) Press the PARAM button
        3) Rotate the Alpha-Dial to the desired parameter [i.e. AFTER-TOUCH, BEND RANGE, etc...]
        4) Press the VALUE button
        5) Change the value by rotating the Alpha-Dial

Quickly step through Tone Parameters using the Alpha-Dial instead of the Number buttons
        1) Press the TONE button
        2) Press the PARAM button
        3) Rotate the Alpha-Dial to the desired parameter [i.e. DCO1 LFO, VCF FREQ, etc...]
        4) Press the VALUE button
        5) Change the value by rotating the Alpha-Dial

Quickly step through MIDI Parameters using the Alpha-Dial instead of the Number buttons
        1) Press the MIDI button
        2) Press the PARAM button
        3) Rotate the Alpha-Dial to the desired parameter [i.e. SYSTEM EXCLUSIVE, CONTROL CHANGE, etc...]
        4) Press the VALUE button
        5) Change the value by rotating the Alpha-Dial

Set UPPER and LOWER SPLIT POINTS using an external MIDI keyboard [ MKS-70 Only ]
Before you start, make sure the current Patch is set to the SPLIT keyboard mode;
Press the 'SHIFT' button then press the 'C' button and press the 'SHIFT' button again.
Now you are ready to set the Split Points.
          1) Press the "PATCH" button
          2) Press the "PARAMETER" button
          3) Press the "1" button
          4) Press the "3" button
          5) Press the "VALUE" button
          6) While holding down the "C" button on the MKS-70, press a key on the external MIDI keyboard at the same time
          7) The new Upper Split Point is now set and shown on the Fluorescent Indicator Panel [FIP]
          8) Press the "PATCH" button
          9) Press the "PARAMETER" button
        10) Press the "1" button
        11) Press the "4" button
        12) Press the "VALUE" button
        13) While holding down the "C" button on the MKS-70, press a key on the external MIDI keyboard at the same time
        14) The new Lower Split Point is now set and shown on the Fluorescent Indicator Panel [FIP]
        When a MIDI NOTE ON is sent higher than the Upper Split Point, Tone A will be played
        When a MIDI NOTE ON is sent lower than the Lower Split Point, Tone B will be played

Set ALL internal Patch Parameters to a BENDER RANGE of 12 [ MKS-70 Only ]
        1) You must have ROM IC v1.03 or greater to use this feature
        2) This Will Replace All Internal Patch Settings! Save data to an M-64C cartridge if needed
        3) Press SHIFT & RIGHT ARROW buttons while powering up the MKS-70

Set ALL internal Patch Parameters to a BENDER RANGE of 2 [ MKS-70 Only ]
        1) You must have ROM IC v1.03 or greater to use this feature
        2) This Will Replace All Internal Patch Settings. Save data to an M-64C cartridge if needed
        3) Press SHIFT & LEFT ARROW buttons while powering up the MKS-70

MIDI NOTE ON Simulation [ MKS-70 Only ]
        Without a keyboard attached to an MKS-70, you can still send a MIDI NOTE ON to the module (useful for module check, bench testing, etc... )
        1) Press the ENTER and SHIFT keys simultaneously and the associated LED's will light up red
        2) Pressing the number button keys 1 through 8 will produce a sound and simulate a MIDI NOTE ON
                a) Pressing the LEFT ARROW button repeatedly will lower the notes by 1 octave increments in pitch
                b) Pressing the RIGHT ARROW button repeatedly will raise the notes by 1 octave increments in pitch

MIDI Bulk Dump*
        1) Push the MIDI button then push the WRITE button. The display responds with 'WRITE MIDI'
        2) Rotate the Alpha-Dial until the display responds with 'MIDI BULK DUMP'
        3) Push the ENTER button
        * The JX-10 requires a special utility program such as CPJXWIN (Windows), GENPATCH (Atari ST), ???(Mac)
          or a Fred Vecoven Super JX-10 v3.x / v4.x ROM IC Upgrade


MIDI Bulk Load*
        1) Push the MIDI button then push the WRITE button. The display responds with 'WRITE MIDI'
        2) Rotate the Alpha-Dial until the display responds with 'MIDI BULK LOAD'
        3) Push the ENTER button
        * The JX-10 requires a special utility program such as CPJXWIN (Windows), GENPATCH (Atari ST), ???(Mac)
          or a Fred Vecoven Super JX-10 v3.x / v4.x ROM IC Upgrade



* * * ERROR MESSAGES * * *

ERROR MESSAGE  RESOLUTION 
 MEMORY PROTECTED 
Set the Protect Switch on the MKS-70 or JX-10 to the 'OFF' position and, if needed, also set the Protect Switch on the M-64C to the 'OFF' position
 INSERT CARTRIDGE 
The cartridge is not properly inserted into the MKS-70 or JX-10. Remove and insert the cartridge again if needed
 MISMATCH 
The cartridge is not appropriate for what you are doing. This can be because of a low battery error on the cartridge or the cartridge is brand new and has not been initialized yet
 NOT M-64C 
This is shown when trying to write Patch, Tone, or MIDI data onto an M-16C cartridge. Change to an M-64C
 SELECT NO. 1-50 
This appears when trying to write to Tones 51 through 100. Tones 51 though 100 may be edited but may not be re-written. Select a Tone number from 1 to 50
 SELECT NO. 1-32 
When trying to call a tone from a JX-8P cartridge other than 1 through 32, this error message appears. Select a Tone from 1 to 32
 MEMORY ERR 
Data is not written properly into memory. Check the battery on the M-64C and the internal battery on the MKS-70 or JX-10. If this message appears frequently, have the synth serviced by Roland


* * * MISCELLANEOUS * * *

JX-10 MIDI SysEx Is Drain Bamaged - The Super JX‑10 is pretty lame with using MIDI SysEx and the best you can hope for on a factory stock JX‑10 is a dump of all the sounds in the cartridge to your computer and back. JX‑10 SysEx only does a handshaking type of MIDI Bulk Dump or MIDI Bulk Load of its cartridge memory. SysEx Patch and Tone editors will not be able to handle this situation. As far as functionality goes, everything must be sent to the JX‑10's cartridge as a whole, so individual Patch or Tone editing is somewhere between ridiculous and impossible.

To get the most out of your JX‑10, get the new v3.x or v4.x ROM IC upgrade from Fred Vecoven. This new ROM update fixes several problems with SysEx on the JX‑10 and enables communication with editors and librarians. The PG‑800 SysEx MIDI Out feature alone is worth the upgrade. The requirement to always have an M‑64C cartridge plugged in is also eliminated.

         SUPER JX http://www.vecoven.com/superjx/superjx.html




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